It is summer 2019 and Sarah Roberts is invited to run a workshop at G39 in Cardiff.  There will be a discussion on collaboration and she quickly concludes this will be best achieved by putting ideas into practice, inviting comments and contributions from collaborators she knows, offering an opportunity to work together and truly committing to getting to know the G39 artists and their practices as well as can be achieved through the platforms of the workshop, WhatsApp, Instagram etc.  Can these long distance support structures they will unfold create tangible links that feel fruitful for all involved?

In contemporary curation - its more about curating people ... James Harper, 2019.

Sarah Roberts and James Harper chat for for about 30 minutes on collaboration, time, curation and support structures etc on a fine Sunday evening.

A BRILLIANT MANIFESTO FROM MCGILVARY WHITE...

We all need art wing people...

Is anyone not collaborating? Can we really work in isolation?

the first journal- for me - is a collaborative work, originally the journal started as a space for all my class mates and collaborators who were doing similar things to come together.  I interviewed them as I wanted to share our ideas to a wider public.  To show how practicing artists feel about things.  Also becoming a research point for people like us to read and relate to while in the studio [ or anywhere] ....Jessie Churchill on contemporary journal  Looking At Painting available in galleries and bookstores in the UK and Globally. There are also copies available in the G39 library c/o Jessie's kindness. 

 

COLLABORATION DEFINITION- THE ACTION OF WORKING WITH SOMEONE TO PRODUCE SOMETHING.  AS ALMOST EVERY EXPERIENCE IS BETTER WHEN YOU SHARE IT WITH SOMEONE- PRODUCING A NEW THING, A REPLICA OR A MESS WITH SOMEONE IS ALMOST ALWAYS BETTER TOO.  

BEX MASSEY [ SHELF] 2019. 

The lovely Matt Antoniak of MILK on Colab

Rebecca Glover's bacterial bonds and capacity for listening ...[precursor to a text and insight into a sketchbook]

To quote ...

All organisms large enough for us to see are composed of once independent microbes, teamed up to become larger wholes. As they merged, many lost what we in retrospect recognise as their former individuality....’ 

- Lynn Margulis, Symbiotic Planet, p35

 

‘If most of the cells in the human body are microbes, which “individual” are we? We can’t segregate our species nor claim distinctive status as a body, a genome or an immune system.’ 

- Scott Gilberts, Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet, Monsters, M71

 

‘I’m searching for my body in the crumbling debris.

I listen behind the chirruping that pierces my temples

 

Get right up close

Tell me where I am.

 

Point meeting point  (s)

 

I see you outside but listening, and you’re crawling down my throat and although I feel your tickling feet I can no longer tell where you and I begin.

 

I remove my headphones and listen through my feet.’

 

- Sketchbook notes, Concots, July 2019 

 

‘Sound becomes sound as it passes through the membrane of the oval window and into the waters of the body, in which the cochlea swims like a caged cephalopod. 

The other is not always conflated to that where it appears to be.’ 

- Patrick Farmer, Azimuth, The ecology of an ear.

 

‘Listen to the sound through one another’s skin. Preserve the sound through membrane and water, to find our form in corresponding.’ 

- Fred Moten, Little Edges

 

Thinking about ‘collaborative survival’...

‘ Precarity is the condition of being vulnerable to others. Unpredictable encounters transform us; we are not in control, even of ourselves. Unable to rely on a stable structure of community, we are thrown into shifting assemblages, which remake us as well as our others. We can’t rely on the status quo; everything is in flux, including our ability to survive. thinking through precarity changes social analysis. A precarious world is a world without teleology. Indeterminacy, the unplanned nature of time, is frightening, but thinking through precarity makes it evident that indeterminacy also makes life possible.’

- Anna Tsing, The Mushroom at the end of the world, On the possibility of life in Capitalist ruins- p20

 

And time in relation to others/collaborations

 

‘Progress is a forward march, drawing other kinds of time into its rhythms. Without that driving beat, we might notice other temporal patterns. Each living thing remakes the world through seasonal pulses of growth, lifetime reproductive patterns, and geographies of expansion. Within a given species, too , there are multiple time-making projects, as organisms enlist each other and coordinate in making landscapes.’

- Anna Tsing, The Mushroom at the end of the world, On the possibility of life in Capitalist ruins- p21

from Rebecca's notebook 😘

Suzy Babington, Ellie Pratt and Neena Percy chat about their collaboration ' The Painting Programme' at Assembly House, Leeds. [ click the pic]

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